October 17: Issue 128

Page 11: NUTRITIONAL SCREENING AT THE NHS ‘FRONT DOOR’ - A REVIEW

1 MUST Nutritional Screening of Adults - a multidisciplinary responsibility. BAPEN Executive Summary (June 2012)

2 Development of a screening tool for assessing risk of undernutrition for patients in the community. Journal Human Nutrition & Dietetics (1998); 11 323-330

3 Nutrition support for adults: oral nutrition support, enteral tube feeding and parenteral nutrition. NICE CG 32- 2006

4 MUST Explanatory Booklet; BAPEN (2011). ISBN 978-1-899467-71-6

5 Leistra et al (2013). Validity of nutritional screening with MUST and SNAQ in hospital outpatients. Eur J Clin Nut 2013

6 Pilgrim et al (2015). Measuring Appetite with the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire identifies hospitalised older people at risk of worse health outcomes. Journal of Nutrition Health and Ageing (2015)

www.subjectiveglobalassessment.com

Page 19: TEXTURE MODIFICATION IN DYSPHAGIA PATIENTS

1 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (2014). RCSLT Resource Manual for Commissioning and Planning Services for SLCN: Dysphagia

2 Mid Stafford Francis Report (2013). Available online at www.midstaffspublicinquiry.com/report

3 PrescQIPP Appropriate thickeners for dysphasia in adults. Bulletin No 100, May 2015. https://www.prescqipp.info/thickeners-for-dysphagia/category/169-thickeners-for-dysphagia

4 Penney B. Use of fluid thickener to reduce Dysphagia risk. Nursing Times 2014; 110 (12)16-18

5 National Patient Safety Agency, Dysphagia Diet Food Texture Descriptors (March 2012)

6 Cichero J et al (2013). The need for international terminology and definitions for texture modified foods and thickened liquids used in dysphagia management: Foundations of a Global Initiative. Curr Phys Med Rehabil Rep, 1:280-291

7 IDDSI (2017). http://iddsi.org/framework/

8 Cichero J (2013). Thickening agents used for dysphagia management: effect on bioavailability of water, medication and feelings of satiety. Nutrition Journal 12:54

9 Niezgoda H, Miville A, Chambers LW, Keller HH. Issues and challenges of modified-texture foods in long-term care: a workshop report. Annals of Long-Term Care: Clinical Care and Aging. 2012; 20(7): 22-27

Page 23: THE MAP MILK ALLERGY GUIDELINES: WHAT’S NEW?

1 Excellence NIfHaC: Diagnosis and assessment of food allergy in children and young people in primary care and community settings. Walsh J, O'Flynn N (2011)Fiocchi A, Brozek J, Schunemann H, Bahna SL, von Berg A, Beyer K, Bozzola M, Bradsher J, Compalati E, Ebisawa M et al. World Allergy Organisation (WAO). Diagnosis and Rationale for Action against Cow's Milk Allergy (DRACMA) Guidelines. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010, 21 Suppl 21:1-125

3 Venter C, Pereira B, Voigt K, Grundy J, Clayton CB, Higgins B, Arshad SH, Dean T: Prevalence and cumulative incidence of food hypersensitivity in the first 3 years of life. Allergy 2008, 63:354-359

4 Schoemaker AA, Sprikkelman AB, Grimshaw KE, Roberts G, Grabenhenrich L, Rosenfeld L, Siegert S, Dubakiene R, Rudzeviciene O, Reche M et al.: Incidence and natural history of challenge-proven cows' milk allergy in European children. EuroPrevall birth cohort. Allergy 2015, 70:963-972

5 Venter C, Brown T, Shah N, Walsh J, Fox AT: Diagnosis and management of non-IgE-mediated cows' milk allergy in infancy - a UK primary care practical guide. Clin Transl Allergy 2013, 3:23

6 Excellence NIfHaC: Cows' milk protein allergy in children. NICE: Clinical Knowledge Summaries. Edited by; 2015

7 Excellence NIfHaC: NICE: Quality standard for food allergy NICE Quality Standard 118. Edited by; 2016

8 Luyt D, Ball H, Makwana N, Green MR, Bravin K, Nasser SM, Clark AT, Standards of Care Committee of the British Society for A, Clinical I: BSACI guideline for the diagnosis and management of cows' milk allergy. Clin Exp Allergy 2014, 44:642-672.

9 Venter C, Brown T, Meyer R, Walsh J, Shah N, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Chen TX, Fleischer DM, Heine RG, Levin M, Vieira MC, Fox AT: Better recognition, diagnosis and management of non-IgE-mediated cows' milk allergy in infancy: iMAP - an international interpretation of the MAP (Milk Allergy in Primary Care) guideline. Clin Transl Allergy 2017, 7:26

Page 31: IMD AND PREGNANCY - CASE STUDY

1) van Spronsen, Francjan J et al. Key European guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with phenylketonuria. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2017; 5(9): 743-756

2) Singh RH, Rohr F, Frazier D et al. Recommendations for the nutrition management of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency. Genetics in Medicine. 2014; 16(2): 121-131

3) Yano S, Moseley K, Bottiglieri T et al. Maternal Phenylketonuria International Collaborative Study revisited: evaluation of maternal nutritional risk factors besides phenylalanine for fetal congenital heart defects. J Inherit Metab Dis (2014) 37: 39

4) Eissier R, Nowak E, Assoun M et al. Maternal phenylketonuria: low phenylalaninemia might increase the risk of intra uterine growth retardation. J Inherit Metab Dis. 2012; 35: 993-999

5) Schwoerer JAS, Obernolte L, Van Calcar S et al. Use of Gastrostomy Tube to Prevent Maternal PKU Syndrome. JIMD Reports, 2012; 6: 15-20

6) Waisbren SE, Rohr F, Anastasoaie V et al. Maternal Phenylketonuria: Long-term outcomes in offspring and post-pregnancy maternal characteristics. JIMD Reports. 2015; 21: 23-33

7) IOM. Weight gain during pregnancy: re-examining the guidelines. Institute of Medicine (US) and National Research Council (US) and Committee to Re-examine IOM Pregnancy Weight Guidelines; 2009

8) UK WHO Growth Chart 0-4yrs, RCPCH (2009). www.rcpch.ac.uk

Page 35: IMD CASE STUDY 2 - PROPIONIC ACIDAEMIA AND A TWIN PREGNANCY

1 Schwoerer J et al (2016). Successful pregnancy and delivery in a women with propionic acidaemia from the Amish community. Molecular Genetics and Metabolism reports. Jun 2; 8: 4-7

2 Pen (2016). Dietitians of Canada Multi fetal practice guidance summary .Practice Evidence in Nutrition. www.pennutrition.com/KnowledgePathway.aspx?kpid=13491&pqcatid=146&pqid=13522. Last accessed 20.7.17

3 World Health Organisation, Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, United Nations University (2007). Report of a joint FAO/WHO/UNU expert consultation (WHO Technical Report Series 935). Protein and amino acid requirements in human nutrition. World Health Organisation, Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, United Nations University

4 Rasmussen KM and Yaktine AL (2009). Weight gain during pregnancy: re-examining the guidelines. Institute of Medicine (US) and National Research Council (US) and Committee to Re-examine IOM pregnancy weight guidelines. Washington (DC): National Academies press (US)

5 Baumgartner et al (2014). Proposed guidelines for the diagnosis and management of methylmalonic and propionic academia. Orphanet J Rare Dis 2014; 9: 130

6 Murphy (2015). Pregnancy in women with Inherited Metabolic Disease. Obstet Med June; 8(2) 61-67

Page 37: NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE (NAFLD): NUTRITION AND LIFESTYLE ADVICE

1 Younossi ZM, Koenig AB, Abdelatif D et al (2016). Global epidemiology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - Meta-analytic assessment of prevalence, incidence, and outcomes. Hepatology 64(1): 73-84. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26707365

2 NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) (2016). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): assessment and management www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng49

3 NICE CKS (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Clinical Knowledge Summary) (2016). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. https://cks.nice.org.uk/non-alcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-nafld#!topicsummary

4 Oliveira CP, de Lima Sanches P, de Abreu-Silva EO, Marcadenti A (2016). Nutrition and physical activity in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. J Diabetes Res. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4685119/

5 Paglialunga S and Clayton AD (2016). Clinical assessment of hepatic de novo lipogenesis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Lipids in Health and Disease 15: 159 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5027077/pdf/12944_2016_Article_321.pdf

6 Chalasani N, Younossi Z et al (2012). The diagnosis and management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: practice guideline by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, American College of Gastroenterology, and the American Gastroenterological Association. Hepatology. 55: 2005-23. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22488764

7 Sattar N, Forrest E, Preiss D (2014). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. BMJ, 349: g4596

8 Ahmed M (2015). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in 2015. World J Hepatol 7(11): 1450-9

9 National Statistics (2017). Statistics on obesity, physical activity and diet. England 2017. Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/613532/obes-phys-acti-diet-eng-2017-rep.pdf

10 Kim D and Kim WR (2017). Non-obese fatty liver disease. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 15(4): 474-85. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27581063

11 Mosca A, Della Corte C et al (2016). Beverage consumption and paediatric NAFLD. Eat Weight Disord 21(4): 581-88

12 Haughton D, Stewart CJ, Day CP, Trenell M (2016). Gut microbiota and lifestyle interventions in NAFLD. Int J Mol Sci 17(4): 447. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27023533

13 Boursier J, Mueller O et al (2016). The severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with gut dysbiosis and shift in the metabolic function of the gut microbiota. Hepatology 63(3): 764-75. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26600078

14 Godos J, Federico A, Dallio M and Scazzina F (2016). Mediterranean diet and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: molecular mechanisms of protection. Int J Food Sci and Nutr 68: 18-27. www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09637486.2016.1214239?journalCode=iijf20

15 Ryan MC, Itsiopoulos C et al (2013). The Mediterranean diet improves hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity in individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. J Hepatol 59: 138-43. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4632797/pdf/ijms-16-25168.pdf

16 Katsagoni CN, Georgoulis M et al (2017). Effects of lifestyle interventions on clinical characteristics of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A meta-analysis. Metabolism Clinical and Experimental 68: 119-32. www.metabolismjournal.com/article/S0026-0495(16)30184-6/fulltext#s0090

17 Gupta V, Xian-Jun M, et al (2015). Oily fish, coffee and walnuts: Dietary treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. World J Gastroenterol 21(37): 10621-35. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4588084/

18 Parker HM, Johnson NA et al (2012). Omega-3 supplementation and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Hepatol 58(4): 944-51. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22023985/

19 Jegatheesan P, Bandt JP (2017). Fructose and NAFLS: The multifaceted aspects of fructose metabolism Nutrients 9(3): 230. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5372893/#B92-nutrients-09-00230

20 Mosca A, Nobili V et al (2017). Serum uric acid concentrations and fructose consumption are independently associated with NASH in children and adolescents. J Hepatology 66(5):1031-6. www.sciencedirect.com.knowledge.idm.oclc.org/science/article/pii/S0168827817300028#b0130

21 Liu J, Xu C et al (2017). Relationship of serum uric acid level with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its inflammation progression in non-obese adults. Hepatology Research 47(3): E104-12. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/hepr.12734/full

22 Hernandez-Rodas MC, Valenzuala R, Videla LA (2015). Relevant aspects of nutritional and dietary interventions in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Int J Mol Sci 16(10): 25168-98. www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/16/10/25168/htm

23 Kennedy OJ, Roderick P et al (2016). Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of cirrhosis Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 43(5): 562-74. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/apt.13523/full

24 Wijarnpreecha et al (2017). Coffee consumption and risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 29(2): e8-e12. https://insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=27824642

25 Alferink LJM, Fittipaldi J et al (2017). Coffee and herbal tea consumption is associated with lower liver stiffness in the general population: The Rotterdam study J Hepatology 67(2): 339-48. www.journal-of-hepatology.eu/article/S0168-8278(17)30147-2/fulltext

26 Buss C, Valle-Tovo C et al (2014). Probiotics and synbiotics may improve liver aminotransferases levels in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients. Ann Hepatol 13(5): 482-8. www.annalsofhepatology.com/revista/numeros/2014/HP145-02-Probiotics%20(F_070814J)_PROTEGIDO.pdf

27 Liu ZL, Xie LZ, Zhu J, Li GQ, Grant SJ, Liu JP (2013a). Herbal medicines for fatty liver disease. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Aug 24; (8):CD009059 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23975682/

28 Liu Y, Dai M et al (2013b). Active smoking, passive smoking, and risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): A population-based study in China. J Epidemiol 23(2):115-21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23399520

29 Zein CO, Unalp A et al (2011). Smoking and severity of hepatic fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease J Hepatol 54(4): 753-9.  NHS Choices (2016). Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) www.nhs.uk/conditions/fatty-liver-disease/Pages/Introduction.aspx

Page 46: UPLIFTED BY MAGGIE’S: AN ALTERNATIVE ‘DAY IN THE OFFICE’

www.maggiescentres.org

www.wcrf.org/int/research-we-fund/cancer-prevention-recommendations/cancer-survivors

www.nhs.uk/change4life-beta/home

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/528193/Eatwell_guide_colour.pdf

www.bda.uk.com/foodfacts/home

www.bad.org.uk/for-the-public/skin-cancer/sunscreen-fact-sheet#uva-star-system

www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/how-to-get-more-fibre-into-your-diet.aspx

www.macmillan.org.uk/aboutus/healthandsocialcareprofessionals/newsandupdates/macvoice/summer2015/newtoiletcardandsymptomchecklist.aspx

http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/2014/03/24/dont-believe-the-hype-10-persistent-cancer-myths-debunked/

10 www.nhs.uk/Conditions/vitamins-minerals/Pages/Vitamins-minerals.aspx

11 www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/food-labelling.aspx

12 http://eatseasonably.co.uk/